COURSE TITLE:

GENERATION Z: Understanding & Teaching The Kids In Our Classrooms

NO. OF CREDITS:

6 QUARTER CREDITS
[semester equivalent = 4.00 credits]

WA CLOCK HRS:  
OREGON PDUs:
60
60

INSTRUCTOR:

Suzanne Warner
sw11235@yahoo.com

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Who is this new generation in our classrooms? Generation Z is comprised of those students born 1995 or thereabouts – they’ve never known a world without the Internet or cellphones. They are enmeshed with social media and have been criticized for having little to no social skills. Yet they are the future and have a lot of positive attributes to offer, but first, we need to teach them in our classrooms in a manner that will lead to their success.

In this course you will learn about Generation Z, how to best meet their unique learning needs, how to engage them in the classroom, as well as learn from them – about what they think, where they’re going, how they’ll change the world. This course is applicable to all content areas and all school personnel, K-12.

The course text, We are Generation Z, is approximately $14 at Amazon.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon completion of this course, participants will have:

1. An understanding of the characteristics of Generation Z and how they differ from previous generations.

2. Strategies for engaging Generation Z students in the classroom.

3. The opportunity to learn what Generation Z thinks of themselves and their future.

4. The opportunity to delve into the social media that is important to Generation Z.

5. A deeper understanding of the concerns about Generation Z as well as the positive influence of Generation Z.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
Completion of all specified assignments is required for issuance of hours or credit. The Heritage Institute does not award partial credit.


HOURS EARNED:
Completing the basic assignments (Section A. Information Acquisition) for this course automatically earns participant’s their choice of CEUs (Continuing Education Units), or Washington State Clock Hours or Oregon PDUs. The Heritage Institute offers CEUs and is an approved provider of Washington State Clock Hours and Oregon PDUs.




 

UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT INFORMATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT
Continuing Education Quarter credits are awarded by Antioch University Seattle (AUS). AUS requires 75% or better for credit at the 400 level and 85% or better to issue credit at the 500 level. These criteria refer both to the amount and quality of work submitted.

  1. Completion of Information Acquisition assignments 30%
  2. Completion of Learning Application assignments 40%
  3. Completion of Integration Paper assignment 30%



 

CREDIT/NO CREDIT (No Letter Grades or Numeric Equivalents on Transcripts)
Antioch University Seattle (AUS) Continuing Education Quarter credit is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis; neither letter grades nor numeric equivalents are on a transcript. 400 level credit is equal to a "C" or better, 500 level credit is equal to a "B" or better. This information is on the back of the transcript.

AUS Continuing Education quarter credits may or may not be accepted into degree programs. Prior to registering determine with your district personnel, department head or state education office the acceptability of these credits for your purpose.

ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION

REQUIRED TEXT

We are Generation Z by Vivek Pandit is about $14 from Amazon.

None. All reading is online.

MATERIALS FEE

none.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHING THIS COURSE:

Suzanne Warner, M.S., received her Masters Degree in Education from the University of Rochester, New York.  She has taught mathematics in the middle school, high school, and college settings, most recently in Oregon. Suzanne has been lauded by administrators, colleagues, students and parents regarding her teaching and classroom management skills. Her students enjoy learning in a respectful, productive environment, where each student is in control of her/his own learning and behaviors. She strongly believes that all students want to do well, and creates a teaching environment for them to succeed. 

When not in the classroom, Suzanne enjoys spending time with her family reading, hiking, backpacking and traveling.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

GENERATION Z: Understanding & Teaching The Kids In Our Classrooms

Barna Group, Gen Z: The Culture, Beliefs and Motivations Shaping the Next Generation, Barna Group, 2018, paperback, 128 pages, ISBN: 978-1945269134

Produced in partnership with Impact 360 Institute, Gen Z: The Culture, Beliefs and Motivations Shaping the Next Generation is Barna's most comprehensive research on the perceptions, experiences, and motivations of 13 to 18 year-olds. Based on interviews and analysis, this report is our best thinking thus far on the worldview of teens in the next, next generation.

In Gen Z, you'll find: Statistics on teens' views of themselves, their spiritual lives, and the world, Comparative data with older generations, Analysis of the cultural trends forming Gen Z, Full color Infographics and data visualizations

 

Seemiller, Corey and Meghan Grace, Generation Z Goes to College, Jossey-Bass, 2016, hard cover, 320 pages, ISBN: 978-1119143451

Generation Z students grew up in a recession and are under no illusions about their prospects for employment after college. While skeptical about the cost and value of higher education, they are also entrepreneurial, innovative, and independent learners concerned with effecting social change. Understanding Generation Z's mindset and goals is paramount to supporting, developing, and educating them through higher education. Generation Z Goes to College showcases findings from an in-depth study of over 1,100 Generation Z college students from 15 vastly different U.S. higher education institutions as well as additional studies from youth, market, and education research related to this generation.

Twenge, Jean M., iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us, Atria Books, 2017, hard cover, 352 pages, ISBN: 978-1501151989

Born in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s and later, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person—perhaps why they are experiencing unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness.

But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality. iGen is also growing up more slowly than previous generations: eighteen-year-olds look and act like fifteen-year-olds used to.

Zarra, Ernest J., The Entitled Generation: Helping Teachers Teach and Reach the Minds and Hearts of Generation Z, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, paperback, 2017, 146 pages, ISBN: 978-1475831924

The Entitled Generation: Helping Teachers Teach and Reach the Minds and Hearts of Generation Z brings teachers into the twenty-first century world of 24-7 technologically-wired up and social media-driven students. This book asks teachers to consider pragmatic and sensible ways to teach Gen Z and to understand the differences between today’s students and those of the past.

Zarra, Ernest J., Helping Parents Understand the Minds and Hearts of Generation Z, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, paperback, 2017, 130 pages, ISBN: 978-1475831894

Helping Parents Understand the Minds and Hearts of Generation Z takes parents into the daily lives of their 24-7, wired-up children. It allows parents and children to speak for themselves. This highly practical book provides parents insights into how Gen Z thinks, the ways their brains learn, and illustrates why children of this technological generation believe and act the ways they do. There are some red flags in American culture and smart technology and digital devices are right there at the center of them all. Students in Gen Z do not recall a time before the Internet and smart technology. As a result, serious issues are arising in American culture within Gen Z. These considerations have implications for families and interpersonal relationships and will also impact future economics, as more and more student from Gen Z graduate college and enter the workforce. Parents will find this book compelling and will be challenged to consider whether their withdrawn, ear-budded children are addicted to their devices and social media, and to where all of this might lead.