COURSE TITLE:

TEACH KIDS TO CONTROL THEMSELVES: The ABC’s of Self-Regulation

NO. OF CREDITS:

5 QUARTER CREDITS
[semester equivalent = 3.33 credits]

WA CLOCK HRS:  
OREGON PDUs:
50
50

INSTRUCTOR:

Jennifer Anders
jennifer@nomadeducator.com

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Self-regulated learners use explicit strategies and skills to engage in their learning – they learn how to learn. Teachers and school professionals, who create a culture of student self-regulation in the classroom and school environment, encourage students to learn how to control their feelings, behaviors, and what they think about when they are learning. This course will motivate and encourage you to implement self-regulation strategies in your classroom. It will enable you to begin talking with your students about how they think about their learning. 

This course is appropriate for teachers K-12, school counselors, school psychologists, and administrators. 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon completion of this course, participants will have:

  • Gained an understanding of the fundamentals of self-regulation and why our 21st-century students are more challenged in this area than in the past.
  • Learned how to begin to foster an environment of self-regulated learners.
  • Discovered what type of Learners your students may be and how to support each type of Learner.
  • Gained an understanding of the ABC’s of self-regulation in learning and ways to Engage students effectively in Learning.
  • Developed personal and classroom goals with your students and understand the goal feedback loop.
  • Practiced ways in which homework can become Home-Study.
  • Gained a deeper understanding of how to promote self-regulation in your classroom and implement some new activities to teach self-regulation.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
Completion of all specified assignments is required for issuance of hours or credit. The Heritage Institute does not award partial credit.


HOURS EARNED:
Completing the basic assignments (Section A. Information Acquisition) for this course automatically earns participant’s their choice of CEUs (Continuing Education Units), or Washington State Clock Hours or Oregon PDUs. The Heritage Institute offers CEUs and is an approved provider of Washington State Clock Hours and Oregon PDUs.




 

UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT INFORMATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT
Continuing Education Quarter credits are awarded by Antioch University Seattle (AUS). AUS requires 75% or better for credit at the 400 level and 85% or better to issue credit at the 500 level. These criteria refer both to the amount and quality of work submitted.

  1. Completion of Information Acquisition assignments 30%
  2. Completion of Learning Application assignments 40%
  3. Completion of Integration Paper assignment 30%



 

CREDIT/NO CREDIT (No Letter Grades or Numeric Equivalents on Transcripts)
Antioch University Seattle (AUS) Continuing Education Quarter credit is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis; neither letter grades nor numeric equivalents are on a transcript. 400 level credit is equal to a "C" or better, 500 level credit is equal to a "B" or better. This information is on the back of the transcript.

AUS Continuing Education quarter credits may or may not be accepted into degree programs. Prior to registering determine with your district personnel, department head or state education office the acceptability of these credits for your purpose.

ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION

REQUIRED TEXT

Required text: Self-Regulation in the Classroom: Helping Students Learn how to Learn, Dr. Richard Cash

All other reading is online.

None. All reading is online.

MATERIALS FEE

Required text $33 on Amazon

ASSIGNMENTS REQUIRED FOR HOURS OR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT

A. INFORMATION ACQUISITION

Assignments done in a course forum will show responses from all educators active in the course. Feel free to read and respond to others comments. 

Assignment #1: GROUP FORUM: Becoming a Lifelong Learner

What does it mean to be a lifelong learner? We know there are many types of learners; discover how Dr. Richard Cash identifies learners and which one you might be, in order to assist you in preparing for your classroom of learners.

Before beginning the assigned text, fill out the form Student Learning Survey:

Download file

Write a 500+ introduction of yourself: include the goals you hope to achieve by taking this course, what age group/grade you are focused on, and what type of Learner you may be based on the survey. Discuss what you learned about yourself from the learner assessment.

Assignment #2: GROUP FORUM: Supporting Self-Regulation in the Classroom

What is Self-Regulation, and why is it important in our classrooms?

Read the Introduction in the required text and watch the following two TEDx Talks to enhance your understanding on the subject of self-regulation:

In Jump, wiggle, learn? Self-Regulation, the presenters share their experiences setting up classrooms using theories and approaches for self-regulation.

 
In this video, international educator, Heidi Ashton, gives an informative talk on how to become a life-long learner.
 

Using information from the text and the videos, write a 500+ word response answering the following questions:

  • How can you begin to develop a classroom culture of self-regulation in your current teaching/school environment?
  • Explain your views on the assertion that self-regulation is even more important for our 21st Century students than for students in the past.
  • What are the social, economic, and psychological drivers affecting students’ ability to self-regulate?

Assignment #3: GROUP FORUM: Avoiding Distractions, Staying Focused and Developing a Sense of Autonom

The skills learned through developing self-regulation strategies will be life-long. Students today need new ways to stay focused and avoid distractions! Read Chapters 1 & 2 in the text and continue to explore the topic in the following fun video:

Sunny Verma, education expert and founder of TutorBright, discusses why kids today are distracted and gives tips for parents to help improve their child’s focus on homework.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/e7n_EvIhJN0?autohide=1&controls=1&showinfo=0
  • Hand out the Student Learning Survey to your classroom (or a few students if you do not have access to a classroom).
  • Create a graph (in any form) for the results from the surveys. Submit the graph of your survey as a PDF. 
  • In a 250+ word response: Discuss the ABC’s required for Learning and the Key Stages of SRL. Include where you believe your student/students may be in the process.
  • Find 2-3 short videos on (1) avoiding distractions, (2) staying focused, and/or (3) self-regulation, that you could share with your class. Submit the links to the videos.

     

Assignment #4: GROUP FORUM: Igniting Interest and Building Confidence

What sparks interest in your classroom? Whether your students are 6 or 16, building and maintaining interest in your subject matter is crucial. Read Chapters 3 & 4 in the text and then study the following article about making math fun. Be sure to watch the embedded short video with Australian mathematics teacher Eddie Woo, on sparking interest in mathematics:

  • Write a 500-word reflection (maybe a log or journal entry, such as suggested in the text) on the four phases of Engaging in Learning.
  • Discuss Figure 3.3 Eight Strategies for Avoiding Distraction with your student/students. If possible, take before and after photos of your classroom and students’ workspaces. Submit the photos in a collage (do not include photos of students or personal information). If photos are not possible, write a short response for how this activity worked or did not work for your situation.
  • With your students, create a list of at least 10 items and activities that they can use when they need a short break (ex. theraputty, jumping jacks in the hall). Submit the list as a typed document or a photo from what you’ve created.

Assignment #5: GROUP FORUM: Metacognition

How does the brain learn new information? How do we get unstuck when we hit a wall in our learning? When our students are solving new problems, even though those problems may have been solved many times before by others, it is a new and creative time for them. Continue expanding your knowledge of how we train our brain to learn new information, expand current ideas, give focused attention when needed, and take breaks to refocus.

Read Chapters 5 & 6 in the text and watch the following short video to increase what you know about metacognition; listen to what these teachers are doing to teach their learners how to think about thinking – you are likely already incorporating many of these strategies!

https://www.youtube.com/embed/oqrDDtJej4I?autohide=1&controls=1&showinfo=0

Choose one of the following activities to do with at least 3 students (or your whole class):

  • Option 1) Initiate a Fluency Activity such as a List All.
  • Option 2) Create an activity that can stimulate Elaboration; ex: make changes/adaptations to a board game.
  • Option 3) Create an activity to develop Originality; for example: create a new use for your Smartphone.
  • Option 4) Develop a Flexibility challenge that you can post on your board and students can answer underneath or in journals; example: explain what would happen if there were no airplanes.
     
  • Submit a short description of your activity; include how your students received the assignment and collaborated on it. Include a photo, if possible.
  • Watch the following short video from Virginia Beach City Public Schools and then Discuss Goal Setting with your student/students:https://www.youtube.com/embed/yiFWPd1PJZc?autohide=1&controls=1&showinfo=0
  • With your students, set an A, B, or C classroom goal for one subject; ex. “We will have fun while learning and know that mistakes help us get better.” If possible, submit a photo of the goal posted somewhere in your classroom (write out the goal, if a photo is not possible)

Assignment #6: GROUP FORUM: Maintaining Focus, Time Management and Homework!

Read Chapters 7 & 8 in the text. Watch the following short video on time management and how computers can both help and hinder us in managing time effectively:

Enhance your understanding of ways to provide opportunities for students to regulate their social and emotional behavior by reading the following text:

https://www.kickboardforschools.com/blog/post/self-regulation-strategies-to-improve-student-classroom-behavior

  • Reflect on your learning by writing a 250+ word reflection discussing the challenges faced by teachers and students with regard to homework, and the possible adaptations you could design with regard to reorganizing your/your school’s view of homework into a practice of “home study.”
  • Create a short ad/movie clip (60-90 seconds) about the subjects in Chapters 7 & 8 (ex. persistence vs. procrastination) or draw a billboard or “pop-up” for a website that advertises what you have learned (such as discussed in Chapter 8). Submit as an attachment for the movie clip or as a photo or screenshot for the website pop-up.

Assignment #7: GROUP FORUM: Reflecting, Processing and Setting Goals for Implementation of SRL

Modeling self-regulation is necessary when implementing SRL strategies in the classroom. Read Chapters 9 & 10 in the text and observe how 2nd-grade teacher Lindsey Minder from Boston, MA models self-regulation and voices her feelings to her students:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/UD9m5n-ZpB0?autohide=1&controls=1&showinfo=0
  • Choose an activity/subject area and briefly introduce it to your students (for example: “subtraction” for Primary grades; “fractions & mixed numbers” for Middle-Schoolers).
  • Administer the Student Assessment Questionnaire for SRL (Primary or Elementary/Secondary) Phases 1 and 2 only (pages 150–151 or 152–153 in the text). Remember to remind your students about their personal or classroom goals.
  • Collect the Questionnaire and continue the activity.
  • Return the Questionnaire during and then at the completion of the activity for Phases 3 and 4.
  • Discuss your results of the Student Assessment Questionnaire in a 500+ word summary – Include answers to the following questions: Did it change your students’ affect or behavior compared to previous activities/tasks? How receptive were your students to the Questionnaire? What might you change about it or try differently next time?

Assignment #8: GROUP FORUM: Putting it all Together

Gain a deeper understanding of how to teach self-regulation in your classroom through the following three articles:

Nina Parrish is a special education middle school teacher. She provides insight and solutions for making learning accessible for students who arrive in our classrooms with developmental delays or emotional challenges:

https://www.edutopia.org/article/how-teach-self-regulation

This blog post offers several easy-to-implement ideas, books, and activities that encourage self-regulation:

https://www.familieslearning.org/blog/promoting-self-regulation-in-the-classroom

Primary school teacher, Elyse Rycroft, offers primary educators fun and engaging activities for supporting self-regulation in the classroom:

https://proudtobeprimary.com/self-regulation-skills/

  • Based on your current classroom situation, create a list of 7-10 activities that you can do to begin teaching self-regulation skills, and how you will implement them.
  • Reflect in 250+ words on how you can change your behavior (and/or your school’s environment) to model the ABC’s of SRL.
  • Submit your list and reflection notes.

Assignment #9: GROUP FORUM: Explore the relationship between self-regulation and self-directed learn

Does self-regulated learning lead to self-directed learners? Through the development of self-regulation strategies in the classroom, are we creating intrinsically motivated students? Review the following video from the “Thinkering Studio” at Birmingham Covington School and observe their approach to creating self-directed, intrinsically-motivated learners. As you watch the video, consider how these theories relate to what you have learned about self-regulation:

  • Write a 500+ word response to the theory that students who develop self-regulation strategies in the classroom have the potential to become self-directed, intrinsically-motivated learners. Do you believe this to be a true statement? Direct your response to the similarities and differences between these theories.
  • Research at least 3 texts, articles and/or videos that support your thesis and submit the links to each site.

ADDITIONAL ASSIGNMENTS REQUIRED FOR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT

B. LEARNING APPLICATION

In this section you will apply your learning to your professional situation. This course assumes that most participants are classroom teachers who have access to students. If you do not have a classroom available to you, please contact the instructor for course modifications. Assignments done in a course forum will show responses from all educators active in the course. Feel free to read and respond to others comments. 

 



Assignment #10: Create a daily lessons plan for implementing SRL into the classroom

At this point, you’ve already implemented several strategies of SRL into your classroom or with your students and have experienced many of the available resources in the text. You’ve also utilized the Student Assessment Questionnaire through one activity/subject area. Now it’s time to create a full daily plan utilizing the strategies and resources available to you in the text and the included articles and videos.

Complete one of the following options:
Option A)

  • With your students, adapt/create individual and classroom goals for one full day of subject periods. For instance, if you choose Monday and on Monday your students normally have a Welcome Meeting, Math, Reading, Art and Inquiry, then you will develop individual goals for each subject as well as a classroom goal. Consider also adding classroom goals for non-structured times such as recess and lunch. 
  • With the resources you have available, do the following with your students, (1) create a poster that reflects ideas for appropriate ways to take a break during class-time and display it in your room; (2) develop baskets of items that a student can utilize to distract, reflect, calm when needed; and (3) set aside an area of the room where a student can go to take a break. 
  • Develop a daily lessons plan for how your chosen day will proceed and what strategies of SRL you will employ throughout the day. Consider these questions: Will you greet your students any differently? Will you transition between activities/subject areas in a new way? Will you employ entrance/exit tickets for any of your lessons? How will you stimulate metacogniton and reduce distractions? Your daily plan should incorporate each session of your day, from arrival to departure, though not every session or activity needs to incorporate SRL strategies, consider what you could do or discuss with your students to get them thinking about their learning. The resources and reproducibles in the text are available for individual and classroom use. Implement your daily plan with your students.
  • Write a 450-500 word commentary on what worked well and what could be improved.
  • Include any student feedback or noteworthy student products.
  • Submit your lesson to your instructor via the lesson tab below. 

                                                                                    OR

Option B)
Use this option if you do not have a classroom available.

  • Create individual goals with children with whom you have a relationship with their parent(s) (or write individual goals for at least 3 theoretical students) and write classroom goals for a theoretical classroom – include the grade of your class - for one full day of subject periods. For instance, if you choose Monday and on Monday your students have a Welcome Meeting, Math, Reading, Art and Inquiry, then you will develop individual goals for each subject as well as a classroom goal. Consider also adding classroom goals for non-structured times such as recess and lunch.
  • With the resources you have available, do the following (1) create a poster that reflects ideas for appropriate ways to take a break during class-time for your theoretical classroom; (2) develop a list of items that a student can utilize to distract, reflect, calm when needed; and (3) consider and describe an area of the room where a student can go to take a break. 
  • Develop a daily plan for how your chosen day will proceed in your theoretical classroom, and what strategies of SRL you will employ throughout the day. Consider these questions: How will you greet your students? How will you transition between activities/subject areas? Will you employ entrance/exit tickets for any of your lessons? Your daily plan should incorporate each session of your day, from arrival to departure, though not every session or activity needs to incorporate SRL strategies, consider what you could do or discuss with your students to get them thinking about their learning. 
  • Write a 500+ word reflection on what you have learned in this course.
  • Submit your daily lesson plan, student goals and photos of your poster and other items, along with your reflection.

(The following is encouraged but not required):

Share what you’ve learned with other teachers taking our courses by also contributing your Lesson to The Heritage Institute Lesson Library located at https://www.hol.edu/lesson-plan-library

Assignment #11: Building Study Habits & Redesigning Homework

Review your "home study" practices with regard to your classroom or classrooms you have known in the past. Re-read Chapter 8 in the text, if needed, and refer to the Home Study Checklist. What types of exercises do you tend to assign (practice, preparation, integration)?  Does your school have a requirement for sending work home on a daily basis? A weekly basis? How do you communicate with parents regarding the self-regulation you are doing in the classroom and how parents can continue to support their self-regulated learners at home? If you do not currently have a classroom, use a class and school with which you are familiar.

Download the following handouts from the text: Tips for Parents and 10 Important Study Habits: 

Download file

Download file

Develop a letter to be sent home to parents that discusses what changes you have made/are making in the classroom (or in your theoretical class) with the implementation of SRL strategies. Include the new vocabulary you are employing and ways in which parents can support and encourage these new strategies. Consider one change you can make (1) in the way you send work home, or (2) how you talk about work being sent home, and describe this change in your letter. Also, consider adding relaxation ideas that kids can do at home. Remember to include in your letter that you encourage students to take mini-breaks, as parents may see these breaks as distractions. Decide if you will also include either or both of the handouts, or adapt one that suits your needs.

Write a 450-500 word reflection on the practice of homework/home study, answering the above questions. Submit to your instructor the reflection and the letter to parents. Consider also sending the letter to your classroom parents.

Assignment #12: (500 Level ONLY)

In addition to the 400 level assignments, complete two (2) of the following assignment options:

Option A)
Consider the following quote in the text from Dr. Richard Cash (2016), "Today's children live in an increasingly differentiated world where new ideas and discoveries are far more important than the repetitions of the past." (Chapter 8). Discover at least 3 articles, blogs or videos supporting Dr. Cash's statement. Consider the cultural factors of why this may be true and the implications of de-socialization due to social media. In 500+ words, summarize your findings.
                                                                                               AND/OR

Option B)
Based on what you've learned, consider how the theories and strategies from this course might prove effective for children with special needs and/or gifted and talented children. How might the strategies need to be adapted? Speak with at least 2 special educators and/or educational psychologists and discuss what you have learned in this course. Design at least 3 activities and/or subject area lesson plans that highlight alternative strategies for implementing SRL with students with special needs. You may choose to study the broad spectrum of special needs or focus on one area of concern, such as students with ASD.
                                                                                                AND/OR

Option C)
Explore the relationship between intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation and self-regulated learning. Is one more important than the other when developing self-regulation? How does interest in a subject change behavior and mood? Prepare a PowerPoint or video presentation that demonstrates your findings. The presentation must be at least 20 slides for a PowerPoint or 3-5 minutes for a video. Include graphics, pictures, video clips. Make it interesting. Be sure to request written permission from parents and school administration if using photos or video of students and staff. Reference and include at least 5 articles, videos and/or websites that discuss the effects of motivation on self-regulated learning and attach a bibliography.

C. INTEGRATION PAPER

Assignment #13: (Required for 400 and 500 Level)

SELF REFLECTION & INTEGRATION PAPER
(Please do not write this paper until you've completed all of your other assignments)

Write a 350-500 word Integration Paper answering these 5 questions:

  1. What did you learn vs. what you expected to learn from this course?
  2. What aspects of the course were most helpful and why?
  3. What further knowledge and skills in this general area do you feel you need?
  4. How, when and where will you use what you have learned?
  5. How and with what other school or community members might you share what you learned?


INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS ON YOUR WORK:

Please indicate by email to the instructor if you would like to receive comments on your assignments.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHING THIS COURSE:

Jennifer Anders, M.Ed., currently lives overseas with her family, as members of the Foreign Service. Over the past 12 years, Jennifer and her family have lived in Germany, Thailand and Washington, DC. Their next assignment is to Seoul, South Korea.

Jennifer earned her M. Ed. in Early Childhood Special Education at the University of Washington, Seattle, with a focus on young children with ASD. She studied under Dr. Ilene Schwartz, at the Haring Center for Applied Research and Training in Education (formerly the Experimental Education Unit). In 2004, Jennifer traveled with Dr. Schwartz and a team of educators to China, collaborating with Chinese educators on Best Practices for children with Autism. Jennifer has training in Positive Behavior Support, Applied Behavior Analysis, the Picture Exchange Communication System and Early Intervention with infants and toddlers. Jennifer received her teaching certification in Washington State in 1995 and is endorsed for P-3 Early Childhood Special Education, K-12 Special Education, and 4-12 English. She received her B.A. at the University of Washington in English and Creative Writing.

Prior to moving overseas, Jennifer worked as a Developmental Preschool Teacher in WA State Public Schools for 3 years before transitioning to the Birth to Three Developmental Center where she worked for 7 years as the Education Coordinator, conducting assessments and writing programs as well as working with local Head Start programs to identify children with special needs. Jennifer helped to build the Autism Program at Birth to Three, training staff and providing 1:1 education and behavioral support for toddlers with ASD. Jennifer also volunteered with the Infant and Early Childhood Conference for 9 years and helped to lead numerous presentations and trainings.

In Washington, DC, Jennifer worked as a Registered Behavior Technician with toddlers with ASD. While overseas, Jennifer has worked as a substitute teacher in the Frankfurt International School, as a volunteer special education coach at the St. Andrews Samakee school in Thailand, and as a private tutor. She studies to learn the language of her host country and became a certified scuba diver while living in Thailand.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

TEACH KIDS TO CONTROL THEMSELVES: The ABC’s of Self-Regulation

Cash, R. M. (2016). Self-regulation in the classroom: helping students learn how to learn. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.  ISBN: 978-1631980329.

  • Text for the course. In Self-regulation in the classroom: helping students learn how to learn, Dr. Richard Cash provides support and strategies for promoting self-directed learning in the classroom and at home. Through current research and theories, Dr. Cash has developed easy-to-implement approaches to help your students gain autonomy in their academic success. All included forms and charts are downloadable and free.
     

Charlton, C. & DeLazzer, H. [TEDxWestVancouverED]. (2014, November 14). Jump, wiggle, learn? Self-Regulation [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSQepSNH-lQ

  • In Jump, wiggle, learn? Self-Regulation, presenters Candace Charlton and Heidi DeLazzer, both IB educators, provide classroom anecdotes from their experiences setting up classrooms using Dr. Stuart Shanker’s theories and approaches for self-regulation.
     

Ashton, H. [TEDxYouth@LBIS]. (2017, December 20). Motivation, self-regulation and learning how to learn [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A64J2eEZ4Os

  • In this TEDxTalk, international educator, Heidi Ashton, gives an informative talk on how to become a life-long learner. The video gives an overview of self-regulation for learners and focuses on the planning-for-learning phase.
     

Newman, P. (ND). Self Regulation Strategies to Improve Student Classroom Behavior. Retrieved from https://www.kickboardforschools.com/blog/post/self-regulation-strategies-to-improve-student-classroom-behavior.

  • This article provides five practical and manageable tools for self-regulation for younger students, such as a Feelings Chart to help identify and explain feelings.
     

Parrish, N. (2018, August 22). How to Teach Self-Regulation: To succeed in school, students need to be able to focus, control their emotions, and adjust to change. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/article/how-teach-self-regulation

  • The author of this article is a special education middle school teacher. She provides insight and solutions for making learning accessible for students who arrive in our classrooms with developmental delays or emotional challenges.
     

National Center for Families Learning. (2018, December 17). Promoting Self-Regulation in the Classroom [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.familieslearning.org/blog/promoting-self-regulation-in-the-classroom

  • This blog post offers several easy-to-implement ideas, books, and activities that encourage self-regulation.
     

Rycroft, E. (ND). Teaching Self-Regulation in the Classroom [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://proudtobeprimary.com/self-regulation- skills/

  • This website offers primary educators fun and engaging activities for supporting self-regulation in the classroom. Through a free subscription, free materials and resources are available.
     

Tutor Bright Tutoring. [Breakfast Television]. (2018, June 14). Tips on helping students stay focused and avoiding distractions when doing homework or studying [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7n_EvIhJN0

  • In this short video clip from a morning show, Sunny Verma, education expert and founder of TutorBright, discusses why kids today are distracted and gives tips for parents to help improve their child’s focus on homework.

Christian, B. [TED-Ed]. (2018, January 2). How to manage your time more effectively (according to machines) [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDbdXTMnOmE​​​​​​​

  • This short, animated TED-Ed video provides a humorous view into how machines can teach us to manage our time more effectively.


Virginia Beach City Public Schools. [VBSchools]. (2017, July 14). Teach: Student Goal-Setting and Reflection [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiFWPd1PJZc

  • 5th Grade teacher, Maria Lamb, gives examples from her classroom about goal-setting. Video includes interviews with students and footage inside the classroom.
     

Edutopia. (2019, January 14). Teaching Self-Regulation by Modeling [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UD9m5n-ZpB0&t=120s​​​​​​​

  • Modeling self-regulation is essential to promoting self-regulation in your classroom. Lindsey Minder, 2nd Grade teacher from Boston, demonstrates how to model emotional awareness in her classroom.
     

Study International Staff. (2019, February 20). Creative ways to make math fun for K12 learners. Retrieved from https://www.studyinternational.com/news/creative-ways-to-make-math-fun-for-k12-learners/

  • This article is about math anxiety in the classroom and features a video with Eddie Woo, award-winning mathematician, who demonstrates how to make math engaging for young learners so that they are thinking about how they are learning math.

The Learning Agency. (2019, October 9). Metacognition | Thinking About Thinking | Science of Learning Series [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqrDDtJej4I

  • In this video, two teachers from Louisiana discuss setting a positive mood every day and building confidence in their students so that their students engage in their learning. They focus on promoting metacognition and the students who are both under-confident and over- confident.


Edutopia. (2017, April 6). Interest-Based Learning: Thinkering Studio: Supporting Self-Directed Learning [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/video/thinkering-studio-supporting-self-directed-learning

  • Birmingham Covington School for grades 3-8 has an election class that allows students to choose a project of their own interest and decide how to proceed with learning from the project. The goal is that students become intrinsically-motivated in their learning.


Additional Resources for Further Study:
Ackerman, C.E. (2019, November 21). What is Self-Regulation? (+95 Skills and Strategies). Retrieved from https://positivepsychology.com/self-regulation/

  • This article by Courtney Ackerman is an extensive resource for information regarding the why and how of self-regulation. Topics discussed include self-regulation in ADHD and Autism; mindfulness; emotional intelligence; and well-being. Information is also provided for working with toddlers and preschoolers.
     

Shanker, S. (2012) Calm, Alert and Learning: Classroom Strategies for Self-Regulation. North York, ON: Pearson Education Canada ISBN: 978-0132927130

  • Dr. Shanker, a Distinguished Research Professor at York University, Ontario, provides comprehensive information in the area of self- regulation that enables teachers to create successful classroom management plans. This book is also useful for parents and other providers working with children in the classroom setting and at home.

Terrant, P. & Holt, D. (2016). Metacognition in the Primary Classroom 1st Edition: A practical guide to helping children understand how they learn best. New York, NY: Routledge.  ISBN: 978-1138842366

  • This guide discusses the importance of explaining metacognition to young children. The authors offer strategies and activities for informing children about taking a responsibility for their learning. Focuses primarily on preschool through 8th grade.

Wilson, D. & Conyers, M. (2016). Teaching Students to Drive Their Brains: Metacognitive Strategies, Activities, and Lesson Ideas. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.  ISBN: 978-1416622116

  • Another good resource for explaining metacognition to PreK-12 students. The authors offer strategies and sample lesson plans on setting goals, focusing attention and monitoring progress.

White, M.C. & DiBenedetto, M.K. (2015). Self-Regulation and the Common Core: Application to ELA Standards, 1st Edition. New York, NY: Routledge.  ISBN: 978-0415714204

  • Self-Regulation and the Common Core offers practical solutions for integrating self-regulation strategies

curriculum and standards.

Zimmerman, B.J. & Schunk, D.H., (Eds.). (2001) Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement 2nd Edition. New York, NY: Routledge. ISBN-13: 978-0805835618

  • ​​​​​​​Internationally-known researchers present the evolution of the theories surrounding self-regulated learning. This text is an excellent tool for professionals in the fields of educational psychology and counseling, as well as educators. Techniques for developing self-regulated learners are discussed and compared.