COURSE TITLE:

RE-THINKING U.S. HISTORY: What Your Teachers Never Told You

NO. OF CREDITS:

3 QUARTER CREDITS
[semester equivalent = 2.00 credits]

WA CLOCK HRS:  
OREGON PDUs:
30
30

INSTRUCTOR:

Wendi Fein
wendifein1@gmail.com

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Turn your history course from boring to beneficial!  We’ve all sat through those dull history classes where the adopted text is the main source of information.  Recently, however, historians such as Howard Zinn and James Loewen have revealed the more interesting and controversial aspects of U.S. History in publications such as The People’s History of the United States and Lies My Teacher Told Me.   After taking Re-Thinking U.S. History, you will energize your teaching, bring your classroom history curriculum up-to-date, and stimulate critical thinking and debate on key issues in United States history.  This course will also show you how real stories about real people are the key to getting your students to enjoy history.   Moreover, through this course, you will understand that you can still encourage patriotism while revealing the human cost in the development of the United States.

            Using a variety of Internet media sources, recent journal articles, and chapters from books, teachers in this class will review the latest research on re-thinking our history from the view of the common people. This course is most applicable to middle school and high school U.S. History teachers.

            Your text cost will vary with your choice.  All other articles and readings will be online.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon completion of this course, participants will have:

1.                That offering multiple perspectives on U.S. History increases opportunities for critical thinking.

2.                That the voices of the common people increase student interest in historical subjects

3.                That the development of empathy is a crucial component of any history class

4.                That comparing and contrasting primary documents is a tool to engage higher-level thinking

5.                That recent historical resources provide meaningful stories easily integrated into history units

6.                Learn how the politics of patriotism can lead to biased historical information.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
Completion of all specified assignments is required for issuance of hours or credit. The Heritage Institute does not award partial credit.


HOURS EARNED:
Completing the basic assignments (Section A. Information Acquisition) for this course automatically earns participant’s their choice of CEUs (Continuing Education Units), or Washington State Clock Hours or Oregon PDUs. The Heritage Institute offers CEUs and is an approved provider of Washington State Clock Hours and Oregon PDUs.




 

UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT INFORMATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT
Continuing Education Quarter credits are awarded by Antioch University Seattle (AUS). AUS requires 75% or better for credit at the 400 level and 85% or better to issue credit at the 500 level. These criteria refer both to the amount and quality of work submitted.

  1. Completion of Information Acquisition assignments 30%
  2. Completion of Learning Application assignments 40%
  3. Completion of Integration Paper assignment 30%



 

CREDIT/NO CREDIT (No Letter Grades or Numeric Equivalents on Transcripts)
Antioch University Seattle (AUS) Continuing Education Quarter credit is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis; neither letter grades nor numeric equivalents are on a transcript. 400 level credit is equal to a "C" or better, 500 level credit is equal to a "B" or better. This information is on the back of the transcript.

AUS Continuing Education quarter credits may or may not be accepted into degree programs. Prior to registering determine with your district personnel, department head or state education office the acceptability of these credits for your purpose.

ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION

REQUIRED TEXT

Books are listed in the bibliography. All books are available on amazon.com. Also check your local library system. All other readings will be available online for specific assignments.

None. All reading is online.

MATERIALS FEE

Cost of text depends of your book choice.

ASSIGNMENTS REQUIRED FOR HOURS OR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT

A. INFORMATION ACQUISITION

Assignments done in a course forum will show responses from all educators active in the course. Feel free to read and respond to others comments. 

Assignment #1: Introduction of Howard Zinn, Voices of a People’s History

Assignment #1: 

Watch the following 2 videos and peruse the Zinn Education website for an overview on Howard Zinn’s philosophy and to hear a reading from his Voices of a People’s History.  As you watch and read, take notes on important themes and ideas which emerge.   Then, write about 500 words summarizing at least one or two key themes which emerge from the videos/website and include ways to incorporate these themes into your teaching.  Include your reflection and opinion on what you saw.

·        “A People’s History of American Empire”  by Howard Zinn.  8:35 min. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Arn3lF5XSUg

         "You can't be Neutral on a Moving Train" by Howard Zinn (rent $2.99) or buy)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwuJjWE-XrA

 

        Zinn Education Project Website      https://www.zinnedproject.org/about/howard-zinn/ 

 

 

 

·      

Post your answer in the online response box.

Assignment #2: Articles: Voices of the Common People

Read at least 3 (three) of the articles which deal with incorporating the voice of the common people into an American History Class.  In 500 words, summarize the opinions, struggles and successes presented.  Then, give your own opinion and reflection on how these ideas may be used in your own classroom.

Some suggestions are:

1.      “Comparing International Textbooks to Develop Historical Thinking”

https://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/articles/se_71010736.pdf

2.      “Learning about the Civil War through Soldiers' Letters”

https://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/articles/se_6906318.pdf

3. Voices of People's History Website

https://peopleshistory.us/teachers/teaching-resources/

4. A History in Which We Can All See Ourselves

https://www.edutopia.org/article/history-which-we-can-all-see-ourselves

5. Inside a New Effort to Change What Schools Teach About Native American History

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/inside-new-effort-change-what-schools-teach-about-native-american-history-180973166/

Post your answer in the online response box.

Assignment #3: Choose 2 topics of US History

Choose 2 (two) areas of United States History in which you would like to gain more knowledge about the views and experiences of the common people.  (It would be good to choose topics from units you will be teaching in the immediate future, so you can deliver and analyze the lessons as required in Assignment #4 for those taking the course for university credit).  From the Bibliography choose to read at least one of the books listed.  You may choose to read only the chapters that apply to the areas of history you would like to focus on.   After reading the specific chapters that apply to the two subjects you chose, write a 500-750 words. Please note:

  • ·          The book title(s) you chose to read and why you chose it.
  • ·          Description of new information you gained in these two subject areas. 
  • ·          Reference to specific stories and primary documents you could use in your classroom to make these two units more interesting.
  •            Reflect on ways you could encourage critical thinking of the issues and events addressed in the reading.

Post your answer in the online response box.

RE-THINKING U.S. HISTORY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bigelow, Bill and Peterson, Bob, editors.  Rethinking Columbus:  The Next 500 years.  1998.  ISBN:  094296120X. Information and activities for elementary through high school.  The assignments and readings show the “discovery” of America from the native point of view. (Amazon.com)

Loewen, James.  Lies My Teacher Told Me:  Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong.  New Press,   2008.  464 pp.  ISBN:  1595583262  New and Revised Edition available Hardback, while earlier editions are available in paperback and on audiobook. (Amazon.com)

Raphael, Ray.  Founding Myths: Stories that Hide our Patriotic Past.  New Press, 2004.  ISBN:  1565849213 Author includes a “note to teachers” and offers a website with lesson plans. (Amazon.com)

Takaki, Ronald.  A Different Mirror:  A History of Multicultural America.  Back Bay Books, 1994.  520 pp.

ISBN:  0316831115 Offers the voices of various ethnic groups and the common people. (Amazon.com)

Takaki, Ronald.  A Larger Memory; A History of Our Diversity, with Voices. Back Bay Books, 1998, 384 pp. ISBN:  0316311626 A more condensed book but similar to his other book listed above. (Amazon.com)

Zinn, Howard.  A People’s History of the United States.  I recommend the abridged teacher’s edition, available on Amazon.com.  However, all editions of this book are good and are available used.

Zinn, Howard.  The Twentieth Century:  A People’s History.  Harper Perennial, 2003.  ISBN:  0060530340 Similar to Zinn’s other books but covers only the 20th century.  (Amazon.com)

Zinn, Howard.  Voices of a People’s History of the United States.  Seven Stories Press.  2004. Handy collection of primary documents for high school and college students.  A teacher guide is available as well as an audiotape of readings.  (Available on Amazon.com)

ADDITIONAL ASSIGNMENTS REQUIRED FOR UNIVERSITY QUARTER CREDIT

B. LEARNING APPLICATION

In this section you will apply your learning to your professional situation. This course assumes that most participants are classroom teachers who have access to students. If you do not have a classroom available to you, please contact the instructor for course modifications. Assignments done in a course forum will show responses from all educators active in the course. Feel free to read and respond to others comments. 

 



Assignment #4: Lesson Plans

NOTE: In your lessons, please use media (power point, documentary films, web sites), primary documents if available, and critical thinking questions for students. Make sure your lessons cover the following:

Lesson Plan Design
Lesson Plan Title, and your name
Audience Enter grade level (& special student group if applicable)
Enter time duration of the entire lesson
Big Idea(s)/Essential Question(s)
Enter learning goal(s) in the form of a question(s)
Objectives(s) Enter Your Objective(s) and correlation to district standards (state,Common Core, other)
Props & Materials Enter props/materials/equipment/any learning handouts
Activities/Tasks/Procedures
Any Special Reminders
Enter activities/tasks/procedures/practice
Enter anything you want to remember to pay attention to
Peer Review Enter peer relationship to you and summary of peer comments

Assignment # 4-A:

  • Create three lessons or adapt three existing ones reflecting what you’ve learned in this course.
  • Implement your lesson with students in your classroom.
  • Write a 250-500 word commentary on what worked well and what could be improved.
  • Include any student feedback or noteworthy student products.
  • Submit your lesson to your instructor via the lesson tab below. 
  • Share what you've learned with other teachers taking our courses by checking the lesson library box when you submit your lesson.  

OR

Assignment #4-B:

Use this option if you do not have a classroom available.

  • Create three lessons or adapt three existing ones reflecting what you’ve learned in this course.. (Do not implement it.)
  • Write a 500+ word article concerning any noteworthy success you’ve had as a teacher with one or more students.
  • Please refer to the guidelines for our blog What Works: Teaching at its Best, www.hol.edu/blog, prior to writing your article.
  • When you submit your article to your instructor, please also email a copy to Yvonne Hall, yvonne@hol.edu,  THI blog curator and media specialist.
  • Indicate whether or not you are OK with having your article considered for publishing on our website. 
  • Submit your article to your instructor via Response field and the modified lesson via Submit Lesson.  
  • As you submit your lesson, consider sharing it with other teachers taking our courses by checking the lesson library box.

Assignment #5: Student research project

Design a research project for students to implement in which they are asked to explore, and document some area of US history which either represents an "untold story," or a subtle (or obvious) misrepresentation of historical facts. In your project description give several examples as prompts, and develop a list of rich questions to guide your student's inquiry. Provide in 250+ words a description of the project and a rubric for assessment. Ask students to reflect on how they can sniff out lies or hyperbole in the current political arena. Then select the lesson tab to submit. 

Assignment #6: (500 Level ONLY)

In addition to the 400 level assignments, complete one of the following:

First, visit both of the following websites:

            http://rethinkingschools.org/

            http://teachingforchange.org/

 

Option A)  Browse the sites and research the purpose, resources, and links offered at these two sites.  Explore the available information and the sources of books, articles connected to these sites.  Write a 2-3 page paper on how these sites can be useful to your teaching. Include names of specific books, articles, and links that you found useful at these sites.  Also compare and contrast the sites and evaluate which you found to be more useful.

OR

Option B) Create another assignment of your own design with prior approval of your instructor.  (See Bibliography for additional ideas.)

Post your answer in the online response box.

C. INTEGRATION PAPER

Assignment #7: (Required for 400 and 500 Level)

SELF REFLECTION & INTEGRATION PAPER
(Please do not write this paper until you've completed all of your other assignments)

Write a 350-500 word Integration Paper answering these 5 questions:

  1. What did you learn vs. what you expected to learn from this course?
  2. What aspects of the course were most helpful and why?
  3. What further knowledge and skills in this general area do you feel you need?
  4. How, when and where will you use what you have learned?
  5. How and with what other school or community members might you share what you learned?


INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS ON YOUR WORK:

Please indicate by email to the instructor if you would like to receive comments on your assignments.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHING THIS COURSE:

Wendi Fein, M.A., enthusiastically brings her years of teaching experiences since 1980 to the development and implementation of her courses. Presently, she is teaching Adult Education, Developmental Math and English as a Second Language at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma Washington.  

She spent 25 years teaching in K-12 public schools with a focus on special education, math, dance, PE, study skills and English/World Cultures. In addition, Wendi has traveled and volunteered extensively, bringing her stories and passion for human rights and equity into the classroom. Wendi holds a B.A. from the University of California, Santa Barbara and an M.A. in Special Education.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

RE-THINKING U.S. HISTORY: What Your Teachers Never Told You

RE-THINKING U.S. HISTORY

 

Bigelow, Bill and Peterson, Bob, editors.  Rethinking Columbus:  The Next 500 years.  1998.  ISBN:  094296120X. Information and activities for elementary through high school.  The assignments and readings show the “discovery” of America from the native point of view. (Amazon.com)

 

Loewen, James.  Lies My Teacher Told Me:  Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong.  New Press,   2008.  464 pp.  ISBN:  1595583262  New and Revised Edition available Hardback, while earlier editions are available in paperback and on audiobook. (Amazon.com)

 

Raphael, Ray.  Founding Myths: Stories that Hide our Patriotic Past.  New Press, 2004.  ISBN:  1565849213 Author includes a “note to teachers” and offers a website with lesson plans. (Amazon.com)

 

Takaki, Ronald.  A Different Mirror:  A History of Multicultural America.  Back Bay Books, 1994.  520 pp.

ISBN:  0316831115 Offers the voices of various ethnic groups and the common people. (Amazon.com)

 

Takaki, Ronald.  A Larger Memory; A History of Our Diversity, with Voices. Back Bay Books, 1998, 384 pp. ISBN:  0316311626 A more condensed book but similar to his other book listed above. (Amazon.com)

 

Zinn, Howard.  A People’s History of the United States.  I recommend the abridged teacher’s edition, available on Amazon.com.  However, all editions of this book are good and are available used.

 

Zinn, Howard.  The Twentieth Century:  A People’s History.  Harper Perennial, 2003.  ISBN:  0060530340 Similar to Zinn’s other books but covers only the 20th century.  (Amazon.com)

 

Zinn, Howard.  Voices of a People’s History of the United States.  Seven Stories Press.  2004. Handy collection of primary documents for high school and college students.  A teacher guide is available as well as an audiotape of readings.  (Available on Amazon.com)